Tag Archives: Study

Study highlights the benefits of a salt reduction strategy to US food industry

New research, published in the Milbank Quarterly, highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) proposed voluntary salt policy on workers in the US food industry. Excess salt consumption is associated

Study: Fat cells play key role in dangerous transformation of melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Carmit Levy and Dr. Tamar Golan of the Department of Human Genetics and Biochemistry at TAU’s Sackler School of Medicine, have discovered that fat cells are involved in the transformation that melanoma

Study examines disparities in prostate cancer survival in Appalachian Kentucky

A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers shows a higher mortality rate for prostate cancer among men from Appalachian Kentucky compared to men from non-Appalachian Kentucky. Published in Rural Remote Health, researchers used data from the

Researchers study effect of Mediterranean diet on pregnancy outcomes

A Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy does not reduce the risk of overall adverse maternal and offspring complications, but may reduce weight gain during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a new study published this week in PLOS

New study explains the molecular mechanism for the therapeutic effects of cilantro

Herbs, including cilantro, have a long history of use as folk medicine anticonvulsants. Until now, many of the underlying mechanisms of how the herbs worked remained unknown. In a new study, researchers uncovered the molecular action that enables cilantro to

Study finds Nunavik Inuit are genetically unique

A new study has found that an Inuit population in Canada’s Arctic are genetically distinct from any known group, and certain genetic variants are correlated with brain aneurysm. Geographically isolated populations often develop unique genetic traits that result from their

Largest genomic study on type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan African populations

National Institute of Health researchers have reported the largest genomic study of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in sub-Saharan Africans, with data from more than 5,000 individuals from Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya. Researchers confirmed known genomic variants and identified a novel

Study sheds light on the darker parts of our genetic heritage

More than half of our genome consists of transposons,DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses.Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases. Very little is known about

Biologist leads pioneering study on stress

A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment

SIRT6 over-expression may prevent progression of diabetes, study finds

Targeting obesity through exercise and calorie restriction is often the first line of approach to treat diabetes and related cardiovascular disorders, such as cardiomyopathy. A recent animal study published in The FASEB Journal explored an alternative sirtuin-based therapy to block

TGen-led study finds link between gene and severe liver damage

Researchers have found that a gene known as AEBP1 may play a central role in the development, severity and potential treatment of liver disease, according to a study by Temple University, the Geisinger Obesity Institute and the Translational Genomics Research

Study finds maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a ‘language gap’

In a first of its kind study, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute evaluated the language use of black mothers in comparison with white mothers with the same education levels

Study finds key metabolic changes in patients with chemotherapy-associated cardiotoxicity

More and more patients are being treated successfully for cancer. However, some cancer treatments that are very effective for breast cancer—medications like anthracyclines and trastuzumab—can cause heart dysfunction and lead to heart failure. Heart-related side effects can limit the amount

Study finds how people engage with science can promote unbelief or beliefs about God

Most Americans believe science and religion are incompatible, but a recent study suggests that scientific engagement can actually promote belief in God. Researchers from the Arizona State University Department of Psychology found that scientific information can create a feeling of

Study examines differences over time in home dialysis initiation by race and ethnicity

A recent analysis reveals that as home dialysis increased from 2005 to 2013 among U.S. patients with kidney failure, racial/ethnic differences in initiating home dialysis narrowed. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of CJASN, indicate that all racial/ethnic

Study reveals link between licensed firearms dealers and intimate partner homicide in urban counties

Much attention continues to be given to crimes committed with illegal guns, but there are high risks of intimate partner homicide with legally purchased firearms as well, according to a new Rutgers University–Camden study. The pioneering study—conducted by Richard Stansfield

Yoga can improve the lives of prisoners, study finds

In 2017, a small group of male prisoners participated in an eight-week yoga program at the Alexander Maconochie Centre(AMC), which houses all adult prisoners in Canberra. While prison yoga programs have been evaluated in other countries, this yoga program was

Autism largely caused by genetics, not environment: Study

(HealthDay)—The largest study of its kind, involving more than 2 million people across five countries, finds that autism spectrum disorders are 80% reliant on inherited genes. That means that environmental causes are responsible for just 20% of the risk. The

Medical marijuana won’t help ease opioid crisis: study

(HealthDay)—Some proponents of medical marijuana have claimed that its use against pain might help curb the ongoing crisis of opioid abuse. But a new study refutes that notion, finding that state laws legalizing medical marijuana have had little impact on

Parkinson’s disease study identifies possible new treatment target

Treatments for Parkinson’s disease have most recently focused on increasing dopamine, a chemical messenger in the brain that affects reward-based behaviors and motivation, as well as movement. A new study by Yale researchers challenges long-held assumptions about dopamine’s sole role

Study pinpoints cell types affected in brains of multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists have discovered that a specific brain cell known as a ‘projection neuron’ has a central role to play in the brain changes seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). The research, published today in Nature, shows that projection neurons are damaged

New study finds both components of blood pressure predict heart attack, stroke risk

Both numbers in a blood pressure reading—the “upper” systolic and the “lower” diastolic—independently predicted the risk of heart attack or stroke in a very large Kaiser Permanente study that included more than 36 million blood pressure readings from more than

Study shows female brain responds to porn the same as male brain

A small team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics has found evidence that suggests the female brain responds to pornography in the same ways as the male brain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the

Study finds keys to music in exercise

If you want people to exercise, it has gotta be fun. And if you want people to turn fitness into a habit, you tap into something that keeps them coming back for more. Music can be that key to getting