Category Archives: Cardiology

Study finds age, race disparities in hospital patient portal use

Removing the barriers of access to technology does not close the digital divide for African American and older patients, according to new research from The Ohio State University College of Medicine. As part of a larger examination of patient portal

New biomarker-guided strategy has potential for liver cancer treatment

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered a cellular pathway tied to cancer that may be beneficial in reducing side effects and extending duration of immunotherapy in some patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common

Dietary quality influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

It is well established that diet influences health and disease, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully understood. Shedding light on the diet-health connection, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reports today in The

Study asked people with mental health disorders to recommend changes to international diagnostic guidelines

A Rutgers University researcher contributed to the first study to seek input from people with common mental health issues on how their disorders are described in diagnostic guidelines. The study, which was conducted by researchers in the United Kingdom and

Iatrogenic disorders in psychiatry are common and neglected

In a paper published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Giovanni Fava and Chiara Rafanelli analyze the literature concerned with iatrogenic disorders in psychiatry, which may be due to medications or psychotherapy. The side effects and risks associated

20mn children not vaccinated in 2018: UN warns against ‘stagnation’

Almost 20 million children missed out on potentially life-saving vaccinations last year, the UN said Monday, as surging measles cases highlighted “dangerous” gaps in efforts to shield kids from preventable illness. Last year, 19.4 million children were “not fully vaccinated”,

Persistent HIV DNA in spinal fluid may be associated with cognitive challenges

Investigators from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the world’s largest and longest-established HIV research network, today announced that the Journal of Clinical Investigation published new findings from the ACTG HIV Reservoirs Cohort Study (A5321). The study found that HIV

A legal framework for vector-borne diseases and land use

Vector-borne diseases cause more than 700,000 deaths and affect hundreds of millions of people per year. These illnesses—caused by parasites, viruses, and bacteria transmitted by insects and animals—account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases on Earth. While many

Study shows widespread global implementation of WHO’s ‘Treat All’ HIV recommendation

A new study published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society shows that the World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2015 recommendation for immediate treatment of all people living with HIV has become the standard of care across HIV clinics in

Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast

Breast cancer patients and women undergoing cancer-preventive breast surgeries may consider combining these procedures with hysterectomy and/or ovarian removal. However, a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in Breast Journal argues against this combined approach: Patients undergoing coordinated breast

Lower than expected risk of bone density decline with Truvada PrEP

Researchers have shown that among users of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent against AIDS that includes tenofovir (Truvada), those with daily use—very high adherence—had only about a 1% average decrease in bone mineral density in the spine and a 0.5%

Many perceive lack of choice in receipt of RAI for thyroid cancer

(HealthDay)—Many patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer perceive that they have no choice about receiving radioactive iodine (RAI), according to a study published online July 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lauren P. Wallner, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University

Doctor burnout costs health care system $4.6 billion a year

Burnout among doctors is costing the U.S. health-care system an estimated $4.6 billion a year in billings because of reduced hours, physician turnover, and expenses associated with finding and hiring replacements, according to a first-time analysis of the overall economic

Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery

One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers. The retrospective study of more than 1,800

Biofilm researchers help doctors understand, treat chronic wounds

Like doctors around the world, Randy Wolcott was confounded by diabetic foot ulcers. When patients would come into his Texas clinic with the small and seemingly harmless sores, caused by the disease restricting blood flow and damaging nerves, the wounds

3-D brain imaging may improve treatment path for MS patients

A new way of looking at the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients could greatly enhance doctors’ ability to select the best therapy for each person. Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas’ Center for BrainHealth have joined colleagues

Study demonstrates stress reduction benefits from petting dogs, cats

College is stressful. Students have classes, papers, and exams. But they also often have work, bills to pay, and so many other pressures common in modern life. Many universities have instituted “Pet Your Stress Away” programs, where students can come

Child psychiatry telephone programs help increase mental health services for children

Telephone hotlines that allow primary care doctors to immediately consult with a child psychiatrist about urgent patient problems appears to increase the number of children who receive aid, offering one strategy to help more children receive mental health services, according

Working memory in psychotic disorders

Working memory—the ability to temporarily store information for decision making and guiding behavior—is impaired in psychotic disorders. It is generally assumed that impaired working memory is caused by dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex. However, little is known about how subprocesses

Methodological limitations keeping at-risk individuals from accessing lifesaving HIV prevention pill

Methodological limitations in HIV drug implementation studies help to explain why high-risk individuals are not accessing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) that can reduce the subsequent risk of HIV infection, according to a new University of Michigan study. Various barriers—from a lack

High intensity interval training (HIIT) may prevent cognitive decline

High intensity interval training (HIIT) may be doing more than just keeping you fit and strong—it may also help prevent age-related cognitive illnesses, such as dementia. A University of Queensland study found high intensity interval exercise may be more effective

Cholesterol-lowering drugs under-prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Statins, the most commonly used effective lipid-lowering drugs, are significantly underutilized to treat lipid abnormalities in patients with and at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), according to a retrospective study of more than 280,000 patients in Alberta, Canada. Investigators

Scientists close in on blood test for Alzheimer’s

Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal—a blood test to screen people for possible signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. On Monday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, half a dozen research groups gave new results

Turbo chip for drug development

In spite of increasing demand, the number of newly developed drugs decreased continuously in the past decades. The search for new active substances, their production, characterization, and screening for biological effectiveness are very complex and costly. One of the reasons